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Interested in Joining a Consortium - Sediment Dynamics
May 9, 2011
2:10 am
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weissd2k
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dear dr walsh

i would also be interested in joining a consortium

our main interest is in the interaction of oil with trace metals and the effects it has on the filtering capacity of the sediment

 

maybe you can get back to me via normal email (d.weiss@imperial.ac.uk)

 

best regards

 

dominik

 

jp walsh said:

I am writing because Reide Corbett and I (J.P. Walsh) are interested in joining a consortium focused on studying the fate of oil in the Gulf seabed.  We have been studying seabed dynamics on the northern Gulf of Mexico for many years, and I directed seabed sampling on one of the spill-response cruises last September.  Specifically, we are interested in how sediment dynamics (e.g., accumulation and storm mixing) will affect hydrocarbon levels in the seabed.  I think there are several compelling scientific reasons to consider our involvement:  

1)  We have many pre-spill samples from the seabed beneath the oil-plume region with considerable spatial (across and along the shelf) and temporal (from 2000, 2004, 2005, 2007) range, and our dried sediment samples may be useful for additional analyses.  Our 2005 samples alone are shown in the yellow squares of Goni et al. (2007) .

2)  We have great knowledge of seasonal, event (e.g., hurricane) and decadal sedimentation in the region through our several years of research (Corbett et al., 2004, 2006, 2007; Walsh et al., 2006; Dail et al., 2007; Goni et al., 2007). 

3)  We have an excellent database of sedimentological information which will be useful in understanding the fate of seabed oil (e.g., grain-size distributions, porosity, x-radiographs, radiochemical activities of 210Pb, 234Th, 7Be).

4)  The sedimentological work we propose will not only add knowledge about oil- spill evolution but also will enable insights into the impacts on benthic fauna and flora, evolution of historical hurricane deposits and potentially the record of future events.

Based on the literature, oil dispersal and dilution is well known to be influenced by interactions with sediments (e.g., via formation of oil-mineral aggregates (OMAs), Lee, 2002).  Because of the abundance of fine sediment in the northern GoM, OMA formation may prove to be very effective at naturally cleaning the coast, enhancing oil biodegradation.  However, OMAs and other processes also will likely shift the deposition and impacts to deeper depths where fine sediments accumulate over longer time-scales, and this may have important impacts on shrimp and other fisheries.  Previous research suggests sedimentation of up to 15% of an oil spill to the seabed (Johansson et al., 1980; Lee and Page, 1997); however, little research has examined offshore deposition.  Ultimately, the dispersal, breakdown and burial of this material may be greatly affected by sedimentary processes and the benthic community and vice versa.

We have a complete radiochemistry lab for analysis of sedimentary processes as well as invaluable tools for investigating  seabed properties, e.g., digital, portable x-ray system, grain-size analyzers, Gust Erosion Chamber System, ICP-OES, XRF and XRD.  Additionally we have a suite of sediment transport equipment (Nortek Aquadopp, PC-ADCP, Vector, OBS and water quality sensors) which can be deployed to monitor seabed resuspension by waves and currents.

 

Please don't hesitate to call if you have any questions or thoughts. 

 

J.P. Walsh and Reide Corbett

Associate and Full Professor, respectively

Department of Geological Sciences and the

Institute for Coastal Science and Policy

East Carolina University

Greenville,NC27858

(252) 328-5431

(252) 258-7683 cell

 

References:

Corbett, D.R., Mckee, B., Allison, M., 2006. Nature of decadal-scale sediment accumulation on the western shelf of the Mississippi River delta. Cont. Shelf Res. 26, 2125-2140.

 

Corbett, D.R., McKee, B., Duncan, D., 2004. An evaluation of mobile mud dynamics in the Mississippi River deltaic region. Mar. Geol. 209, 91-112.

 

Dail, M.B., Reide Corbett, D., Walsh, J.P., 2007. Assessing the importance of tropical cyclones on continental margin sedimentation in the Mississippi delta region. Cont. Shelf Res. 27, 1857-1874.

 

Goni, M.A., Alleau, Y., Corbett, D., Walsh, J.P., Mallinson, D., Allison, M.A., Gordon, E., Petsch, S., and T.M. Dellapena. 2007. The effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the seabed of the Louisiana shelf. The Sedimentary Record, 5: 4-9.

 

Johansson, S., Larsson, U., Boehm, P., 1980. The Tsesis oil spill impact on the pelagic ecosystem. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 11, 284-293.

 

Lee, K., 2002. Oil–Particle Interactions in Aquatic Environments: Influence on the Transport, Fate, Effect and Remediation of Oil Spills. Spill Sci. Technol. Bull. 8, 3-8.

 

Lee, R.F., Page, D.S., 1997. Petroleum hydrocarbons and their effects in subtidal regions after major oil spills. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 34, 928-940.

 

Corbett, D.R., Dail, M., McKee, B., 2007. High-frequency time-series of the dynamic sedimentation processes on the western shelf of the Mississippi River Delta. Cont. Shelf Res. 27, 1600-1615.

 

Walsh, J. P., Corbett, R. , Mallinson, D. , Goni, M. Dail, C. Loewy, K. Marciniak, K. Ryan, C. Smith, A. Stevens, B. Sumners, and T. Tesi. 2006. Mississippi Delta Mudflow Activity and 2005 Gulf Hurricanes, Eos Trans. AGU, 87(44): 477-478, doi:10.1029/2006EO440002.

May 6, 2011
5:38 pm
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jp walsh
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I am writing because Reide Corbett and I (J.P. Walsh) are interested in joining a consortium focused on studying the fate of oil in the Gulf seabed.  We have been studying seabed dynamics on the northern Gulf of Mexico for many years, and I directed seabed sampling on one of the spill-response cruises last September.  Specifically, we are interested in how sediment dynamics (e.g., accumulation and storm mixing) will affect hydrocarbon levels in the seabed.  I think there are several compelling scientific reasons to consider our involvement:  

1)  We have many pre-spill samples from the seabed beneath the oil-plume region with considerable spatial (across and along the shelf) and temporal (from 2000, 2004, 2005, 2007) range, and our dried sediment samples may be useful for additional analyses.  Our 2005 samples alone are shown in the yellow squares of Goni et al. (2007) .

2)  We have great knowledge of seasonal, event (e.g., hurricane) and decadal sedimentation in the region through our several years of research (Corbett et al., 2004, 2006, 2007; Walsh et al., 2006; Dail et al., 2007; Goni et al., 2007). 

3)  We have an excellent database of sedimentological information which will be useful in understanding the fate of seabed oil (e.g., grain-size distributions, porosity, x-radiographs, radiochemical activities of 210Pb, 234Th, 7Be).

4)  The sedimentological work we propose will not only add knowledge about oil- spill evolution but also will enable insights into the impacts on benthic fauna and flora, evolution of historical hurricane deposits and potentially the record of future events.

Based on the literature, oil dispersal and dilution is well known to be influenced by interactions with sediments (e.g., via formation of oil-mineral aggregates (OMAs), Lee, 2002).  Because of the abundance of fine sediment in the northern GoM, OMA formation may prove to be very effective at naturally cleaning the coast, enhancing oil biodegradation.  However, OMAs and other processes also will likely shift the deposition and impacts to deeper depths where fine sediments accumulate over longer time-scales, and this may have important impacts on shrimp and other fisheries.  Previous research suggests sedimentation of up to 15% of an oil spill to the seabed (Johansson et al., 1980; Lee and Page, 1997); however, little research has examined offshore deposition.  Ultimately, the dispersal, breakdown and burial of this material may be greatly affected by sedimentary processes and the benthic community and vice versa.

We have a complete radiochemistry lab for analysis of sedimentary processes as well as invaluable tools for investigating  seabed properties, e.g., digital, portable x-ray system, grain-size analyzers, Gust Erosion Chamber System, ICP-OES, XRF and XRD.  Additionally we have a suite of sediment transport equipment (Nortek Aquadopp, PC-ADCP, Vector, OBS and water quality sensors) which can be deployed to monitor seabed resuspension by waves and currents.

 

Please don't hesitate to call if you have any questions or thoughts. 

 

J.P. Walsh and Reide Corbett

Associate and Full Professor, respectively

Department of Geological Sciences and the

Institute for Coastal Science and Policy

East Carolina University

Greenville,NC27858

(252) 328-5431

(252) 258-7683 cell

 

References:

Corbett, D.R., Mckee, B., Allison, M., 2006. Nature of decadal-scale sediment accumulation on the western shelf of the Mississippi River delta. Cont. Shelf Res. 26, 2125-2140.

 

Corbett, D.R., McKee, B., Duncan, D., 2004. An evaluation of mobile mud dynamics in the Mississippi River deltaic region. Mar. Geol. 209, 91-112.

 

Dail, M.B., Reide Corbett, D., Walsh, J.P., 2007. Assessing the importance of tropical cyclones on continental margin sedimentation in the Mississippi delta region. Cont. Shelf Res. 27, 1857-1874.

 

Goni, M.A., Alleau, Y., Corbett, D., Walsh, J.P., Mallinson, D., Allison, M.A., Gordon, E., Petsch, S., and T.M. Dellapena. 2007. The effects of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita on the seabed of the Louisiana shelf. The Sedimentary Record, 5: 4-9.

 

Johansson, S., Larsson, U., Boehm, P., 1980. The Tsesis oil spill impact on the pelagic ecosystem. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 11, 284-293.

 

Lee, K., 2002. Oil–Particle Interactions in Aquatic Environments: Influence on the Transport, Fate, Effect and Remediation of Oil Spills. Spill Sci. Technol. Bull. 8, 3-8.

 

Lee, R.F., Page, D.S., 1997. Petroleum hydrocarbons and their effects in subtidal regions after major oil spills. Mar. Pollut. Bull. 34, 928-940.

 

Corbett, D.R., Dail, M., McKee, B., 2007. High-frequency time-series of the dynamic sedimentation processes on the western shelf of the Mississippi River Delta. Cont. Shelf Res. 27, 1600-1615.

 

Walsh, J. P., Corbett, R. , Mallinson, D. , Goni, M. Dail, C. Loewy, K. Marciniak, K. Ryan, C. Smith, A. Stevens, B. Sumners, and T. Tesi. 2006. Mississippi Delta Mudflow Activity and 2005 Gulf Hurricanes, Eos Trans. AGU, 87(44): 477-478, doi:10.1029/2006EO440002.

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