Titanic Explorer’s Science Team To Study BP Spill Effects On Deep Gulf, TV Station Reports

The Remote Operating Vessel Hercules lowered into the Gulf of Mexico from the deck of the E/V Nautilus in 2014.

(Click to enlarge) The Remote Operating Vessel Hercules lowered into the Gulf of Mexico from the deck of the E/V Nautilus in 2014.

The scientific team underwritten by oceanographer Robert Ballard, who located the remains of the Titanic in 1985, is kicking off an exploration of deepwater corals and other species to determine their health five years after the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, WDSU-TV reports.

(From NOLA.com / The Times-Picayune / by Mark Schleifstein) The research is part of a six-month expedition that will take Ballard’s E/V Nautilus and his Corps of Exploration to various locations in the Gulf of Mexico before traversing the Panama Canal to conduct research in the Pacific Ocean, all the way to British Columbia.

The scientific team underwritten by oceanographer Robert Ballard, who located the remains of the Titanic in 1985, is kicking off an exploration of deepwater corals and other species to determine their health five years after the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, WDSU-TV reports.

The team is allowing the public to follow their explorations with a live video feed of their daily operations.

The journey begins with a 12-day study of natural hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf, part of a research project of the Gulf Integrated Spill Response Consortium, which is funded by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative. The independent science conducted by the initiative is funded by a $500 million, 10-year grant made by BP soon after the April 2010 accident.

The researchers then team with the ECOGIG group, also funded by GOMRI, to look at both seeps and ecosystem responses and effects caused by the spill.

Read the full  article here: http://www.nola.com/environment/index.ssf/2015/04/titanic_explorers_science_team.html

GoMRI “In the news” is a reposting of articles about GoMRI-funded research (published by various news outlets). The author’s interpretations and opinions expressed in these articles is not necessarily that of GoMRI.